http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/podcasts.howstuffworks.com/hsw/podcasts/symhc/2016-03-23-symhc-wasp-2.mp3?plead=please-dont-download-this-or-our-lawyers-wont-let-us-host-audio

missedinhistory:

The duties of the women of the WASP evolved over time, and some of them were quite dangerous. And once the program ended, there were (and still are) controversies over whether the women involved should be recognized as military veterans.

Here’s a link to our show notes for the episode, with links to the resources discussed in it.

Hazel Ying Lee, one of two Chinese-American WASP, who was killed in the line of duty on November 25, 1944. (National Archives photo)

Jacqueline Cochran, director of the WASP, with General Hap Arnold  (public domain photo)

Nancy Harkness Love, who commanded the WAFS and later became

executive for all WASP ferrying operations (National Archives and Records Administration photo)

WASP in Waco, Texas (USAF photo)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s